Imaginary Moral High Ground

What follows is the next excerpt from my second book on climate, the forthcoming Aztec Nation. To buy my first book, click here

So, if the United States is on the verge of ceding a good bit of its remaining power to Russia, simply because of the two nations’ opinions about climate and resultant energy choices, it must be doing so on the basis of some kind of higher morality, right?

Sadly, no. The U.S. is about as far from the moral high ground on climate as you can be. Part of that is just the fact that we have created a couple of generations of people who believe that the atmosphere above them is in a state that it has never been in before, which is patently false. Earth was warmer than now 1,000 years ago, 7,000 years ago, and 115,000 years ago – at a minimum. So, if the amount of heat in the system is the same that it has been in the past, how can one call the current conditions “unnatural”? One might just as logically, more logically, call them “natural,” and indeed that is what I do myself.

One analogy is the Sun rising in the morning. What if, by some combination of technology and effort, humanity could somehow make it even more certain that the Sun would rise? Would the fact that one of the reasons that the Sun rose in the morning had to do with humanity’s actions somehow make it a bad thing? Continue reading

Posted in Barack Obama, climate skeptics, global warming, morality | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

The Age of Foolishness

(Over the next several weeks, I’ll be posting several excerpts from my forthcoming book, Aztec Nation. The second such excerpt is below. Here’s a link to my first book: clicky.)

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness…. – Charles Dickens

How I wish wildfires were the only natural phenomenon employed in the public relations campaign that is global warming alarmism. They are not. A partial list of the other things that nature does that are now presented as unnatural includes the following: tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, droughts, and perfect sunny days with highs in the low 70s. Actually, please forgive me, this last item is not on the list. Sometimes, I get just a little tweaked about all of this – I admit it.

But the other four items are on the list. And the chances of watching national news in the United States and not seeing one of them on any given day is close to non-existent. There are a lot of reasons for this. One is that, after decades of being known as the biggest impediment to any eventual reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases, the United States has a sizable population of people who are eager to atone for this perceived sin. And at least 90 percent of members of the American media fall within this population. Continue reading

Posted in aztec nation, climate skepticism, drought, forest fire, global warming | Tagged , , ,

How Dare I Not?

Anthony Watts rightly points out that if I wish for people to support my work in progress, I should let them know what it is they are supporting.

While I fought a long and  strenuous battle to make Don’t Sell Your Coat as accessible as I possibly could, I am committed to making my next book more so. It is less academic, and more conversational. It has fewer graphs. So, after reading the (mercifully brief) chapter that follows, please do hit the tip jar if you are so inclined.  

From Aztec Nation (working title):

Among the results of becoming a person who doubts the mainstream view of climate change have been the following experiences:

  1. Having my integrity questioned. Despite copious evidence to the contrary, there remains a belief among the public that anyone who dares to question mainstream science on climate change is being funded by Big Oil. The hilarious part, as I pointed out in Don’t Sell Your Coat is that Big Oil has been funding alarmist climate scientists for decades now, to the tune of billions of dollars, and that it has not been doing the same thing for skeptic scientists. The widespread perception when it comes to climate science that the warmists have integrity and the skeptics don’t, while based on faulty logic and bad information, makes being a skeptic something less than fun. I’m not asking you to cry for me, Argentina. But I’d be lying if I said my life got easier when I became a skeptic. The truth is that it became dramatically harder. And the difficulty show no signs of letting up anytime soon. Continue reading
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New Book in Process — Please Donate Generously

Very rarely, I mention the fact that being a climate change skeptic not only does not pay but actually costs those of us who have taken an unpopular position on the topic. With my next book on the subject sufficiently under way for me to mention it publicly, I am obligated to mention, too, that my tip jar could use a massive influx from as many people who support this work as possible. All donations make it feasible for me to continue my work and feed my children, and every little bit helps. Thanks in advance! — Harold

 

Posted in new climate change book | Tagged | 5 Comments

Did That Canary Just Flutter Its Wings?

2013 -- the year it happened?The year you’re living in, 2013, may be the year that it happened.

What is it? It is the onset of global cooling. How dare I make such a mental leap? How dare I not would be an equally good question.

According to the Danish Meteorological Institute, 2013 is the first year since 1976 when Arctic temperature readings north of 80 degrees latitude sat below the zero-anomaly line, what some would call “normal,” for more than 50 days straight. Getting close to 60, in fact, according to my highly scientific eyeball reading of DMI’s graph that you can click on yourself. Go ahead, click through the last few decades. Are you seeing what I’m seeing? Continue reading

Posted in Arctic temperature, don't sell your coat, global cooling, global warming | Tagged , , | 13 Comments

Unprecedented Melt? Not Exactly. Unprecedented Scientific Folly? You bet!

The Antarctic's annual cycle is its own accordion-like expansion and contraction. But it is dwarfed by the larger expansions and contractions between glacial and interglacial periods during the present ice age.

The Antarctic’s annual cycle is its own accordion-like expansion and contraction. But it is dwarfed by the larger expansions and contractions between glacial and interglacial periods during the present ice age.

As many of my readers know, the fact that Antarctic sea ice has steadily grown during the entire satellite record is something that I’ve alluded to frequently in the past. Some of you will know, too, that the temperature at the South Pole has gone down during the same period, as I’ve mentioned that here and elsewhere, including in my book.

Global warming alarmists have, meanwhile, made endless hay out of the fact that ice shelves have broken up during the last couple of decades. I mention in my book that if you could watch time-lase video of Antarctic ice shelves, as seen from space, over the last three million years you would see an accordion being played by a quite energetic player. Out they go, and in they come, out they go, and in they come. One feature that should convince people that climate is not changing outside normal bounds is precisely that ice shelves are continuing to do what they’ve done during the present ice age. This notion that until the last 50 years ice shelves were stable, in other words, is patently anti-scientific. And potentially manipulative and evil, but let’s worry about that another day. Continue reading

Posted in Antarctic sea ice, don't sell your coat, ice age, sea ice | 2 Comments

Old Time New England Winter

A little evening snow in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, on a far gentler night than tonight. Photo by Jeff Stevens.

A little evening snow in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, on a far gentler night than tonight. Photo by Jeff Stevens.

I live in a historic part of a historic New England town: East Greenwich, Rhode Island, to be precise.

It’s tough to walk five minutes in any direction here without running across a cemetery or two with graves from two or three centuries back. The cemeteries range in size from 20 plots to 2,000.

Our part of town is known as the Hill. You can see it in the picture I chose for the blog today. In fact, the church spire in the background of the photo is the one belonging to our family church, St. Luke’s Episcopal. The open space in the right foreground is Academy Field, where sledding, baseball, soccer, and dog exercising manage to share time and space with admirable ease throughout the year. Continue reading

Posted in blowing snow, Climate change, don't sell your coat, global warming, harold ambler | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Blizzard Reading

Once you realize how badly you have been misled by AGW zealots, you suddenly understand that you must now pay attention to climate science on a totally new level.

Once you realize how badly you have been misled by AGW zealots, you suddenly understand that you must now pay attention to climate science on a totally new level.

If you have only recently become a skeptic, or only recently started thinking about it, then you may not be aware of the logical inconsistencies built into the theory that manmade global warming is turning the climate system into a post-Edenic nightmare.

I could list quite a number of them (and have before and will again), but need to be making preparations for the impending blizzard here in Rhode Island. So, in the time available to me, I will say this: Pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “It used to be snowier,” and then responds to equivalent snowfall in the current moment by saying, “This was caused by global warming,” pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “Storms of all kinds have gotten worse,” and you point out the dozens of instances proving the contrary, and they say, “Sandy was unprecedented,” pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “Winters used to be colder,” and you show them that winter weather runs in decadal, centennial, and millennial cycles, and they say, “But when I was a kid it was colder,” pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “Whenever it is cold now, that is really the result of global warming,” pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “American droughts of the last few years are unprecedented,” and you show them that droughts of the 1950s and 1930s were worse, and that megadroughts on the order of 500 years in duration have been found in the climate record of the land that is now the U.S. Southwest, pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “Look at this graph, temperatures are skyrocketing,” and you say, “That’s an anomaly graph, and you’re showing a tiny fluctuation that has occurred thousands of times before,” and they say, “We must do something before it’s too late,” pay attention.

When the global warming crowd says, “How dare you question science,” and you point out that (a) science and reason have to be closely acquainted at all times, (b) you question the reasoning underlying global warming, and (c) that all true scientists have questioned authority pretty much all the time and they say, again, “Yes, and how dare you question the science,” pay attention.

That’s enough for now. I have to go do about a hundred things, having had to work until late last night.

In the meantime, if you or someone you know needs a little blizzard reading, you can buy my book here.

Thank you for paying attention.

Posted in blizzard, Climate change, don't sell your coat, global warming | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

New York Times Sets Bar Just a Little Higher for Climate Misinformation

The News York Times has its standards: All the news that fits the narrative of climate doom.

The News York Times has its standards: All the news that fits the narrative of climate doom.

Sunday, January 20, 11:43 a.m. EST, update: Andy Revkin kindly took the time to make sure the right set of eyes fell on a third letter I wrote, and the Times has fixed the piece and issued a formal correction. To Andy I offer my sincere thanks. With my book focusing in part on a century-long habit of promulgating climate fear at the Times it is gratifying to have the paper catch an accurate glimpse of its own reflection in the blogosphere mirror, if even for a moment. By the way, a screencap of the original article with the mistake is below (beneath that the original blog post can be found).

That's what screen grabs are for: the original Times piece with the incorrect statement and link claiming record global temperatures in 2012.

That’s what screen grabs are for: the original Times piece with the incorrect statement and link claiming record global temperatures in 2012.

When I found a rather major error in a New York Times article about climate change, I took the trouble to write the editors. I did so via two channels. One of the two ways was sending a letter to the editorial page editors; the other was writing the Times‘ public editor. As I have not heard back from either, I have decided to publish my own letter below. I will add that it has been my experience that if I don’t hear back quickly from editors then I don’t hear back from them at all.

Dear Editor:

There is a tendency among those declaring the seriousness of global warming to equate small pieces of the climate puzzle, when those pieces support a narrative of disaster, with the whole picture, but this is neither good science nor good journalism.

In the Jan. 15 online edition Jada Smith falls prey to the temptation: “With record-breaking global temperatures in 2012severe droughts and several storms and hurricanes on the East Coast, some members of the American clergy are saying that human decisions that contribute to the extreme weather associated with climate change can no longer be left in the hands of politicians.”

The year 2012 was not a record-setting one for global temperatures. The United States, 1.5% of Earth’s surface, did experience record temperatures, and indeed clicking the first link for “global temperatures” brings one to another Times article about the American record.

The United States is a wonderful country, but it is not the world.

Harold Ambler
East Greenwich, RI
p.s. The global temperature ranking for 2012 is available here:

Now, letters to the Times have a 150-word limit, thus my effort to be concise. But I don’t have the same limitations on my own blog. :)

And I confess that even knowing the extent to which the Times distorts climate information I am astounded that equating the U.S. temperature record with the world temperature record, when brought to the paper’s editors’ attention, does not merit a correction. It has come to this.

I expect non-experts driving in their cars on the way to work and who catch a story about record temperatures on NPR would frequently just assume that the temperatures in question were global. But the fact that a reporter at the most prestigious newspaper in the United States would not have a higher standard of discernment than the distracted and half-listening commuter is bracing. The fact that the reporters’ editors would fail to consider such an error worthy of correction is … wait for it … the single most glaring proof of the bias in American journalism regarding climate that I have seen.

I know, I know. Most of my readers will be surprised that I am surprised.

And yet I am. Don’t sell your coat.
Posted in Climate change, crying wolf, don't sell your coat, global warming, record temperatures | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

Britain’s Cold Comes as No Surprise

The first book by an American journalist to predict the strengthening of winter and the slow undoing of the global warming narrative helps put climate science in a new perspective.

The first book by an American journalist to predict the strengthening of winter and the slow undoing of the global warming narrative helps put climate science in a new perspective.

People say a version of the following to me all the time: “How dare you contradict mainstream science regarding climate change?”

Most of the Spanish Inquisition conversationalists haven’t any sense of the diversity of scientific findings within the climatology community. They don’t know how many honest and brilliant people of science all over the world have never accepted the manmade global warming narrative at face value.

So, yes, in writing my book that predicted the kind of cold Britain and much of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere is about to experience (or already experiencing), I did have to stop listening exclusively to the clique of scientists dominating the media and the United Nations’ climate apparatus long enough to understand that another narrative even existed. That is true. (UK Amazon link for book here.)

I also had to think seriously about the destructive nature of cold and what it meant if the AGW narrative builders were wrong about winter’s premature demise. It meant old people dying in their homes for lack of heat, particularly in the era of carbon targets imposed from above on utility companies. And that is just what is happening these days in the UK, as energy prices have skyrocketed at the same time that wintertime need has steadily grown, as it has over the course of the last several years.

And let’s be clear: the manmade global warming team predicted the diminishment of winter’s power, publicly, and repeatedly, for decades. Conversely, the climate skeptic community of scientists ranged in its predictions from seasonal variability to mild global cooling during the first half of the 21st century.

Such cooling, if it were to occur, by the way, would, as likely as not, begin with a slow turnaround of the climate system. And that turnaround might look a lot like what we’re seeing today. The kind of heat that built during the last few decades of the 20th century doesn’t dissipate overnight.

In the meantime, ask yourself, those of you shivering in Britain, the European continent, and Asia during the winter of 2012-2013: does a book predicting such conditions hold any interest?

Don’t sell your coat.

Posted in British cold weather, don't sell your coat, energy prices spike, frozen Europe, winter weather 2013 | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment